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20121003
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. >> woodruff: and we return to the war in syria-- one of the pressing issues facing wor leaders at the u.n. gathering this week. margaret warner sat down with turkey's foreign minister yesterday in new york to discuss the crisis. her report begins with a look at how the conflict has jumped the turkey-syria border. >> warner: as civil war engulfs their homeland, thousands more syrians flee every month. many of them heading north, into turkey. >> they bombarded us with aircraft and mortars when we were in our homes. my family and villagers fled to the turkish border. >> warner: the u.n. refugee agency estimates about 85,000 syrians are now living in camps inside the turkish border. they're among some 250,000 syrians who've sought refuge in neighboring states. 100,000 arrived in august alone, amid some of the deadliest fighting since the syrian uprising began 18 months ago. on the frontline of the crisis, turkish prime minister recep tayyip erdogan had harsh words this month about the outside world's response. >> ( translated ): syria is going through a huge humanitarian crisis. unfortunately
leaders said at the u.n., and joined by former state department adviser now at the woodrow wilson center. aaron, thank you for coming in. benjamin netanyahu had a big diagram and relying on it. what happens if iran carries on enriching uranium? >> that is a problem that no one has the answer to. negotiations may have slowed to some degree iran's determination to acquire nuclear weapons capacity, but the truth is, we do not know. israel's default position is clear, if we do not succeed to negotiation, then military strength, preferably by the u.s. >> [indiscernible] >> this is the key. president obama is running for reelection. he understands that the last thing he needs is more uncertainty. oil prices could quadruple. plunging markets, more americans dying in afghanistan as a consequence of iran in troublemaker in -- troublemaking. as of right now, he does not accept the notion that this is a war of necessity. israel believes so, but no one else in the international community right now believes it. >> could there be a difference path for iran? >> i do not know. i suspect the intelligence
on the city of homs in syria; the coming meeting of the u.n. general assembly; a genetic breakthrough for breast cancer; and three personal takes on the dropout crisis. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the backlash against islamist militias in libya gained momentum today. the military named army officers to replace the heads of two of the most powerful militias. that followed the fatal assault on the u.s. consulate there that killed the american ambassador. on sunday, libyan president mohammed el-megaref ordered all militias to obey the government or disband. in egypt today, 14 members of an extremist group were sentenced to death by hanging. the men were convicted in attacks on a police station and bank in the sinai peninsula in june of 2011. six of the men were present for sentencing but eight others were tried in absentia and remain fugitives. a former police chief at the heart of a major political scandal in china is facing 15 years in prison. that sentence was imposed today on wang lijun for trying to defect to the u.s., and helping c
for eight years before assuming his current post in 2009. he is in new york for the u.n. general assembly, nato has significantly redefined its mission since its founding in 1949. it's primarily-- last year it enforce add no-fly zone in libya and the campaign that overthrew moammar qaddafi. i'm pleased to have the secretary general at this table, welcome. tell me how you have defined the role for nato in the current environment, especially in the middle east. >> the core role is still to protect our citizens against any threat to their security we won the cold war. we protected our citizens against soviet communism, aggression. we won the cold war. the soviet broke down but after the end of the cold war we realized that we are faced we merging security challenges, terrorism, this is the reason why we are in afghanistan. that's why we are now building a nato missile defense system to protect our populations against milz attacks. piracy, this is the reasons why we conduct counterpiracy operation. so across the board we have taken on responsibility for new missions but, again, with the core
with the united nations because we're also -- [ all talking at once ] >> america has made this u.n. worthless. america has made a statement that we will not -- >> obama -- >> obama has said so. that's it. >> obama is tossing this load right over to united nations,he not? >> no money. >> no. >> he said the united nations will take care of it in so many words about. >> no, that's not what he said. >> we're members of the united nations. >> he was clearly saying what the united states would do, not what the united nations would do. >> is this physics or optics on the part of netanyahu? >> it's physicsp. >> it's also optics. >> of course. because when you have something that look hikes an atomic bomb and smells like an atomic bomb and can blow you up, it no longer becomes optics. >> didn't you say at the beginning this suddenly emerges as a big what, edge of the election issue? >> if it failed, it failed. john stewart had the perfect approach on him in the cartoowas silly. >> they kicked it over into the new year. the whole thing has been kicked over to the new year. >> has it become kicked over
for more money to help syrians, as its estimate of refugees fleeing the fighting grew. the u.n. and its aid partners are now requesting more than $487 million in humanitarian assistance. by the end of the year, they estimate as many as 700,000 people will leave syria. the u.n.'s regional refugee coordinator made the appeal today in geneva. >> as we are seeing thousands of people crossing the borders and all the humanitarian actors were standing to help them and to provide the assistance, we only have one-third of the funding to be able to respond. so, continuous, generous response from donor countries at this crucial moment as winter, we are entering the winter period, it's really, extremely important. we are running out of time and we need the funding urgently. >> sreenivasan: separately, lebanese t.v. aired footage claiming to show syrian troops retaking control of an army complex rebels attacked yesterday in damascus. wednesday's bombings marked the largest security breach in the heavily-guarded capital since july. one of the most wanted drug traffickers in mexico has been captured. the
not meet with any foreign leaders. instead secretary of state hillary clinton had one-on-one with the u.n. special representative to syria and a number of other officials. margaret warner is at the united nations. i spoke to her just a short time ago. hello, margaret. so what message was president obama in his speech and secretary clinton in her meetings trying to send? >> warner: judy, i think the way to look at this is a tough love speech from the president and also privately from secretary clinton. and that is to the leaders of these post revolutionary countries that are now trying to make this transition -- and they have to stand up to violence and intolerance in their own societies and extremism -- and president obama said, you know, it's not that we endorse hateful speech. we thought the video was offensive but even when i am criticized with hateful speech, he said, i will fiercely defend the right of people to say it. he also gave them a very practical reason. he said, you know, you're not going to be able to deliver to people what you promise, what they elected you to do, which is
the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nation, and it's a way of denying any legitimacy to the claim
to protect the great barrier reef. the u.n. says that unless more is done, the reef risks losing its world heritage list davis. this would turn into a political and ecological disaster. it has just been stand by google. are these pictures about to go from being an up-to-date window on the "masterpiece to a collection for an archive? >> a thrilling sport tradition or a crow and antiquated form of entertainment? in mexico, the debate is raging on whether to ban bullfighting. >> it is still one of the most controversial past times in the americas. bullfighting has been practiced in mexico since the time of the conquistadores, but its days might now be numbered. last year, a proposed ban in the mexican capital only felt at the final hurdle. this time around, the activists are convinced that the legislation will pass. following a partial ban in countries like peru and ecuador, this, the largest bullring in the world in mexico as potential the next site to be closed down. that is something that these fans and the workers here are desperate to avoid. this has been in the hernandez family for five
" group along the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly meeting. two of syria's key allies, russia and china, were not included in the talks. clinton said the u.s. was offering the opposition an additional $45 million in non- lethal and humanitarian aid. she also used the opportunity to single out iran for aiding forces loyal to president bashar al-assad. 's most important lifeline is iran. last week a senior iranian official publicly acknowledged that members of the iranian revolutionary guard corp. are operating inside syria. there is no longer any doubt that tehran will do whatever it takes to protect its proxy and crony in damascus. >> sreenivasan: in washington, defense secretary leon panetta confirmed the u.s. has intelligence that shows the syrian regime has moved some of its chemical weapons to better secure them. he also said the major stockpiles at main sites are believed to be secure. in august, president obama threatened u.s. action if syria moves or uses its chemical weapons. meanwhile, in syria, the battle for control of the northern city of aleppo intensified as rebe
, am bush, we believe that with our partners, again, a great public private partnership, u.n. women, is a partner of ours in this initiative, and many others, and we will achieve that number of 5 million, and here is another great example, where this is connected once again, not just to our water neutrality, not just to us are, our belief of stronger sustainable community, but also to that initiative of 5 by 20. >> rose: when you go into a country whether it is africa or asia or latin america, wherever it might be, what is the breakdown in terms of hiring, in terms of local versus outside, in terms of men versus women? meaning the comparisons. >> in terms of local versus outside? >> rose: what is the goal? >> well in terms of local versus outside it is almost all local. >> rose: right. >> so we are a local business that hires locally, that produces locally, distributes locally, sells locally and pays taxes locally. >> rose: all right. the developing markets have become huge for you, even more so than north america or not? >> well, let me just put it into perspective. the three and a
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight more conversations from the u.n. general assembly and the clinton global initiative. we begin with president clinton. >> we continue with former prime minister tony blair. >> and we conclude with the president of iran, mahmoud ahmadinejad. three perspectives on the middle east, the arab spring and iran when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: new york city this week was the site of two major global conferences, one the united nations general assembly in which representatives of the nations who are members of the general assembly come here, including heads of state and foreign ministers and others at the clinton global initiative, business and government and ngo s were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was ir
and other new residents. and economically. u.n.c. professor and long time political reporter says north carolina is moving in two directions at once >> the up escalator in this state is the economic diversification into higher-wage, higher-skill, research and development, biotechnology. the down escalator is the collapse of the traditional industries of textiles, tobacco and furniture. and the elevation of the unemployment rate. >> brown: you can see the dividing lines everywhere. in downtown durham where an old tobacco plant is now an upscale historic district, home to restaurants and businesses with an art center and the durham bulls' athletic park across the way. while some 80 miles away in more rural rocky mount, old textile plants and mills sit shuttered. all this, he says, plays into the state's divided politics >> where the republicans have gained in this state is particularly among blue-collar people and rural people that in the older south used to be democrats. >> brown: romney ads address the job losses directly >> here in north carolina, we're not better off under president o
sells five million iphone 5's over the weekend, but some expected more. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: u.s. investors began the week focused again on the global economy. the latest sign of worry: business confidence fell in germany for a fifth straight month in september. the international monetary fund today called on the international community to help finance the bailouts of euro- zone countries. that had u.s. markets following global markets lower. the dow fell 20 points, the nasdaq lost 19 and the s&p was down three. those worries in europe, are part of the reason the international monetary fund is shaving it's outlook for the global economy. the i.m.f.'s managing director says the trend has been clearly heading down. and, as darren gersh reports, she is calling on leaders in europe and the u.s. to change direction. >> reporter: the managing director of the i.m.f. has been described as the world's chief financial fire fighter. and today, christine lagarde urged policy makers in europe to make sure another spark doesn't re-ignite the crisis. >> we need a sustained re
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie has the night off. there's almost $3 trillion in u.s. mutual fund money markets. regulators want to make them safer. the third quarter ends for investors. it's been a good quarter and it could get better if history is any guide. then the c.e.o. of platinum miner stillwater mining joins us. global demand and why platinum is cheaper than gold. that and more tonight on n.b.r.! an unusually public battle over money market regulation begins our broadcast time. the debate is testing the regulatory structure put in place by the dodd-frank financial reforms after the credit crisis. under pressure from treasury secretary timothy geithner, the new financial stability oversight council is making a strong push for controversial rules aimed at preventing a run on what many think of as a safer place for investors to put their money. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: for an investment designed to be as boring as possible, money market funds have set off a fierce regulatory battle. last month, the s.e.
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone, i'm susie gharib. american factories were going all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and ou
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)